Anemia in Pregnancy: Correlating CD4 Count and Hemoglobin Values among HIV Infected Women

Main Article Content

Lem Edith Abongwa
Ngenwi Annabella A.
Fenui Vanessa Sancho

Abstract

Anemia is a common and serious complication in both Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and pregnant women. Anemia has shown to have serious implications for both the mother and her fetus. However, the prevalence of anemia in HIV-infected pregnant women in Cameroon has not been well characterized in the era of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). This study seeks to investigate the correlation between CD4+ count and hemoglobin (Hb) values in pregnant women with HIV infection.

At enrolment, the prevalence of any grade of anemia (Hb < 11 g/dl) was 128(42.2%). The prevalence of anemia was significantly high (p =0.042) in women who were not on treatment 61(49.2%). Moderate grades of anemia 63(20.8%) were common in HIV-infected patients while 3 of the 4 cases of severe grades of anemia were common in patients who were on HAART. The low prevalence of anemia among treated HIV-infected, pregnant women indicate that the treatment of all HIV positive pregnant women at the first antenatal visit is essential.

Keywords:
Anemia, HIV, pregnant women, hemoglobin, CD4 T cells count.

Article Details

How to Cite
Abongwa, L. E., A., N. A., & Sancho, F. V. (2020). Anemia in Pregnancy: Correlating CD4 Count and Hemoglobin Values among HIV Infected Women. Asian Hematology Research Journal, 3(4), 9-16. Retrieved from https://www.journalahrj.com/index.php/AHRJ/article/view/30138
Section
Original Research Article